Solar Cooking – Impossible Coconut Pie II

While I enjoyed our previous (first shot at) Solar Impossible Pie, I KNOW that our family will enjoy following a dessert recipe even more. Among all of those types of recipes gleaned off of the Internet, the MOST popular seemed to be Impossible Coconut Pie, then I happened across “Impossible Coconut Pie II” found on allrecipes.com that had near a perfect 5 star rating out of 49 evaluations as I type this.  The recipe below is adjusted to add a little extra coconut, (which we enjoy).  I will not be pouring the entire mix in my little camping skillet, believing a teenage granddaughter will know what to do with the leftovers. 😀  Please note that this is NOT a “coconut creme pie” – that is a totally different recipe – if you prepare it thinking “coconut creme” you are destined for disappointment. 8)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 1/4 cup flaked coconut
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 4 tablespoons margarine
  • 3/4 cup white sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Directions

Place milk, coconut, eggs, vanilla, flour, margarine, and sugar in blender. Mix well. Pour into a greased and floured container, (again, I am using my little camping skillet with lid, however, a couple of black pie pans would work just as well). We used butter and about 3 tblsp of flour, then tapped off the excess flour onto a paper towel.  I waited until I had the pan in my little glass “solar cooking chamber” to sprinkle 3 pinches, (thumb & forefinger), of  nutmeg on top.

Today our temperature outside was about 75 degrees with PLENTY of sunshine.  Cooking time for this dish, under these conditions, should be well over 2 hours.  For our initial try, we waited until 1 1/2 hours had elapsed before I “peeked”, at which time a toothpick test told me it was well away from being fully set. Given the additional coconut we added, that also added more cooking time. The next time we do this dish we will wait a full 2 hours before the initial peek/test.  Total cooking time under today’s conditions, including 1 extra “peek”  was 2 hours 50 minutes.

Ours was served with Cool Whip with a generous sprinkling of toasted coconut on top which is highly recommended for this pie.  We let it “rest” on the kitchen counter while preparing and eating dinner – given that time it collapsed down to a very custard-like consistency and flavor. (Not bad at all for a 1st try).

Notes: Since the regular baking flour used in this recipe will not cause it to rise near as much as bisquick would, I was able to introduce all but about 1/4 cup of the entire mix into my little camping skillet without too much fear.  Your mileage may vary depending upon your cooking container.  After the initial try I have reduced the butter in this recipe from 6 to 4 tablespoons and may reduce it further to 3 pending our next try at this one – we enjoyed it well enough to assure there WILL be more. Also, if your cooking pan is non-stick, there is no reason to grease/flour it before cooking. I am additionally going to recommend that you assure your cooker is on a surface that is pretty level – plan to chalk that up as a “lesson re-learned”. 🙂

Solar Cooking Impossible Coconut Pie II
Solar Cooking Impossible Coconut Pie II

 

Fresh out of the ASSC it passed the teenager sniff test

Fresh out of the ASSC it passed the teenager sniff test

Again, (as found on the ASSC web site), we use Anchor Hocking oven-ware to form our “solar cooking chamber”, necessary to keep the wind from blowing across the pot and cooling it. This time it is just two 9.5″ glass pie plates with one inverted over the other. For recipes involving taller pots, we will use an inverted Anchor Hocking 4 qt. mixing bowl, and for the tallest, two of the same.  I should note here that Mr. La Joie does so many demonstrations he now uses plastic mixing bowls to avoid breakage and the sheer weight considerations.

This entry was posted by dave on Tuesday, June 7th, 2011 at 1:01 pm and is filed under Uncategorized . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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